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Ferns and Flowering Plants

County Recorder: Martin Sanford (BSBI & SNS)


Suffolk Flora


Species list

Annual Knawel
annual knawel

Annual Knawel Scleranthus annuus

A small inconspicuous plant with tiny green flowers. The flowers lack petals and comprise of five green-pointed sepals that usually spread outwards when in fruit. (Prunus spinosa). Image: Stuart Read (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Plantlife, Online Atlas of British and Irish Flora

Basil Thyme
Basil Thyme

Basil Thyme Clinopodium acinos

At only 15 cm high, this annual or short-lived perennial with a creeping or upright habitat might be overlooked. It produces whorls of violet flowers with white markings on the lower lip. Image: Alex Hyde / Back from the Brink (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Plantlife, Online Atlas of British and Irish Flora

Bearded Stonewort
bearded stonewort

Bearded Stonewort Chara canescens

A simple water plant with whorls of narrow leaf-like branches along its length, and covered with dense spines. Image: Tom Langton (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Plantlife, Marine Life Information Network

Borrer's Saltmarsh-Grass
Borrer's saltmarsh grass

Borrer's Saltmarsh-Grass Puccinellia fasciculata

A tufted perennial herb of bare places by the sea, in grazing marshes around cattle-poached pools and depressions, on earthen sea walls, vehicle tracks and the mud dredged from ditches. Image: Otto (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalistOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Broad-leaved Cudweed
Broad-leaved Cudweed

Broad-leaved Cudweed Filago pyramidata

An attractive, silvery-green plant that holds heads of tiny hidden flowers on the tops of short stems. Image: Andre H. NL (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Corn Buttercup
Corn Buttercup

Corn Buttercup Ranunculus arvensis

A smaller relative of the more common buttercups with a paler lemon-yellow hue. Image: Alex Hyde / Back from the Brink (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Cornflower
Cornflower

Cornflower Centaurea cyanus

An iconic image of rural meadows, these bright blue flowers were once a common sight in cornfields. Image: Natural England / Peter Wakely (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Crested Cow-Wheat
Crested Cow-wheat

Crested Cow-Wheat Melampyrum cristatum

This lovely wildflower is found in grassland and is semi-parasitic on other plants. It is now very rare in the UK, being confined to East Anglia. It has densely-packed flower heads with toothed bracts which are deep rose-purple in colour and purple and yellow flowers. Image: Natural England / Neil Pike (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, First NatureOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Divided Sedge
Divided Sedge

Divided Sedge Carex divisa

A rhizomatous perennial herb of brackish ditches, dune-slacks and damp grasslands near the sea. It avoids areas of standing water. Image: Jeremy Halls (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Early Marsh Orchid (cream flowered)
Early Marsh Orchid

Early Marsh Orchid (cream flowered) Dactylorhiza incarnata subs. ochroleuca

A creamy yellow subspecies of Early Marsh Orchid is one of the rarest UK orchids. Currently it exists in two small colonies, one in Suffolk and one in Cambridgeshire. (Prunus spinosa). Image: Wiltscat (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Plantlife, Online Atlas of British and Irish Flora

Field Wormwood
Field Wormwood

Field Wormwood Artemisia campestris

A very rare native which in the UK is found only in Breckland. It flowers from August to September and grows to 75cm in height, usually forming a many-branched clump. Its leaves are silvery green, very finely cut into linear segments. Image: Natural England / Peter Wakely (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora, Flora of East Anglia ID guideBack from the Brink (pdf)

Fine-leaved Sandwort
Fine-leaved Sandwort

Fine-leaved Sandwort Minuartia hybrida

Fine-leaved sandwort is a slender branched annual. The hairless stems grow up to 20 cm tall with linear strap-like short leaves. The flowers have five white petals and are 6 mm across. The petals are much shorter than the white bordered sepals. Image: Eleftherios Katsillis (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Fingered Speedwell
Fingered Speedwell

Fingered Speedwell Veronica triphyllos

A low-growing, hairy plant with deep blue flowers. Its leaves rarely grow longer than a centimetre and are deeply divided into parallel-fingered lobes. Image: Andreas Rockstein (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Flat Sedge
Flat Sedge

Flat Sedge Blysmus compressus

A rhizomatous perennial of open, sedge-rich areas in calcareous flushes, marshes, fens and damp grassland and pond and stream borders subject to flooding. Image: Oskar Gran (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Fly Orchid
Fly Orchid

Fly Orchid Ophrys insectifera

A clever mimic, the flowers closely resemble little flies, attracting insects to pollinate them. They are not easy to spot as their rather drab colouring blends with the surrounding vegetation, but they often form colonies of ten or more plants. Image: Stuart Read (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Frog Orchid
Frog Orchid

Frog Orchid Dactylorhiza viridis

The flowers are green, but often tinged with purple, red or brown and, as the name suggests, look like small frogs when you get up close. Image: Gertjan van Noord (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Grape-Hyacinth
Grape-hyacinth

Grape-Hyacinth  Muscari neglectum

The flowers are small and a deep blue, turning to black-purple as they mature, with thin curling leaves and a deep sweet scent. Image: Robert (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Greater Water-Parsnip
Greater Water-parsnip

Greater Water-Parsnip Sium latifolium

Greater water-parsnip is a robust, bright green, hairless, perennial which can grow up to 2m tall in shallow, sheltered, often still water. Image: Mark Joy (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Man Orchid
Man orchid

Man Orchid Orchis anthropophora

The Man orchid has a dense pack of yellow-green flowers of a vaguely humanoid shape, giving the impression that numerous man-shaped beings are dangling from its stem. Image: Stuart Read (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Marsh Stitchwort
Marsh Stitchwort

Marsh Stitchwort Stellaria palustris

Short to medium, greyish, creeping plant with erect, square, smooth stems. Image: Natural England / Peter Wakely (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Native Black Poplar
Native Black Poplar Catkins

Native Black Poplar Populus nigra ssp. betulifolia

Suffolk Priority Species. Imposing, elegant, rare. The black poplar was once a staple of Britain’s landscape but these days, the trees are few and far between. Image: Stuart Read (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Woodland TrustOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Pillwort
Pillwort

Pillwort Pilularia globulifera

This tiny plant is a type of creeping fern. It is hard to spot because it has thin, grass-like leaves and often grows with water grasses or small rushes. The ‘pills’ are tiny round spore cases at the bases of the stems. Image: Len Worthington (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Prickly Saltwort
Prickly Saltwort

Prickly Saltwort Salsola kali

A native annual plant that grows, usually more or less prostrate, in sandy coastal soils just above the drift-line on the foreshore or at the base of foredunes: much rarer on sand/shingle mixtures. Image: Doughdee (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalistOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Purple Milk-Vetch
Purple Milk-Vetch

Purple Milk-Vetch Astragalus danicus

It is a low-growing, hairy herb. Purple milk-vetch's flowers are gathered densely and compactly, once these have died back swollen pea-like seed pods take their place. Image: Natural England / Peter Wakely (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Rare Spring-Sedge
Rare Spring-Sedge

Rare Spring-Sedge Carex ericetorum

Carex ericetorum is an early flowering sedge of short, species-rich calcareous grassland. Image: Nick Gibbons (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora, Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland (pdf)

Red Hemp-Nettle
Red Hemp-Nettle

Red Hemp-Nettle Galeopsis angustifolia

A short but conspicuous plant with a spike of two-lipped red flowers at the top and nettle-shaped leaves below. Image: Andreas Rockstein (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Red-tipped Cudweed
Red-tipped Cudweed

Red-tipped Cudweed Filago lutescens

A small plant resembling a tiny thistle but with hidden flowers clustered at its top. Its overall appearance varies from grey to grey-green although sometimes has a characteristic yellowish hue. Image: Andreas Rockstein (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Sea Barley
Sea Barley

Sea Barley Hordeum marinum

This small native grass has the look of a Barley in miniature but is easily overlooked. Image: Gerjan van Noord (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Shepherd’s Needle
Shepherd’s Needle

Shepherd’s Needle Scandix pecten-veneris

This little plant is a member of the carrot family, with groups of small white flowers in umbels and feathery leaves on the stems. The seed pods are very long and thin, held in upright clusters, hence its common name. Image: Stuart Read (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Slender Hare's-Ear
Slender Hare's-Ear

Slender Hare's-Ear Bupleurum tenuissimum

This slender, often diminutive, annual is primarily a colonist of thinly vegetated or disturbed coastal sites, including coastal banks, sea walls, drained estuarine marshes and the margins of brackish ditches. Image: Patrick Hacker (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Small Cord-Grass
Small Cord-Grass

Small Cord-Grass Spartina maritima

A perennial herb of tidal mud-flats such as in saltmarsh creeks and pans, and on bare ground behind sea walls. Image: Duarte Frade (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora, JNCC

Small-Flowered Catchfly
Small-flowered Catchfly

Small-Flowered Catchfly Silene gallica

A neat campion with small white flowers and sticky stems and leaves. Image: Martin Sanford (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Spanish Catchfly
Spanish Catchfly

Spanish Catchfly Silene otites

A delicate and rare plant, Spanish Catchfly is found only in the grass heaths and roadsides of East Anglia. Image: Stuart Read (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Spreading Hedge-Parsley
Spreading Hedge-Parsley

Spreading Hedge-Parsley Torilis arvensis

A low, widely branching plant with small white flowers grouped into umbels. The little fruits have a narrow groove down one side and are elsewhere covered with soft hooked spines. Image: Gilles San Martin (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Spring Speedwell
Spring Speedwell

Spring Speedwell Veronica verna

Spring Speedwell is a small annual wildflower that is entirely confined to the Brecks of East Anglia. It generally grows to less than 5 cm in height and can often be much smaller. Image: Andreas Rockstein (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora, Back from the Brink (pdf)

Stinking Goosefoot
Stinking Goosefoot

Stinking Goosefoot Chenopodium vulvaria

Stinking Goosefoot is so called because of its obnoxious stench of rotting fish. Image: Andre H. NL (iNaturalist).

Find out more: iNaturalist, First NatureOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Tower Mustard
Tower Mustard

Tower Mustard Arabis glabra

A tall, slim, grey-green plant with small creamy flowers at the top of the stem. It can grow up to 4 feet high. Image: Steve Guttman (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, PlantlifeOnline Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

Tubular Water-Dropwort
Tubular Water-Dropwort

Tubular Water-Dropwort Oenanthe fistulosa

Tubular Water-dropwort is a delicate wetland plant. It has tall upright hollow stems. and small white flowers in umbels at the end of long stalks Image: Stuart Reed (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora, Freshwater Habitats Trust (pdf)

Unspotted Lungwort
Unspotted Lungwort

Unspotted Lungwort Pulmonaria obscura

Unspotted lungwort (or Suffolk lungwort) flowers early in the spring in lush woods. Its newly opened flowers are light red, changing later to purple and finally virtually blue. Image: Stuart Read (Flickr).

Find out more: iNaturalist, Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora



About 635,000 plant records were used as the basis of maps in A Flora of Suffolk (2010). Records from the Atlas 2000 survey, the 5 squares (TL75, TL78, TM05, TM35 and TM38 plus TM06 completed by Richard Addington) surveyed in the Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland (BSBI) Monitoring Scheme survey, the Churchyard Survey (1987-present), Protected Roadside Verge surveys, and most Phase II sites surveys have all been computerised. All records published in TSNS, Watsonia or received in correspondence have also been computerised along with data collected specifically for the Suffolk Flora from 2000-2010. All 10 km records from Simpson's Flora and all post-1980 records from Enid Hyde's BSBI records have been transferred to RECORDER. Data on the Ipswich Museum herbarium is held on a simple Dbase file produced by volunteer Peter Furze, there are over 16,000 records on file, many of which relate to Suffolk specimens.

Since publication in 2010 new records have continued to be added to the system and recorders are encouraged to try and update pre-2000 records for each 10-km square to ensure good coverage for the next national atlas. The SBIS Database now has over 750,000 records.
Details of national recording schemes can be found on the Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland website; this site also hosts downloadable recording cards for East and West Suffolk.

A variety of national maps are available via the Online Atlas of the British and Irish Flora

The publication of The Vascular Plant Red Data List of Great Britain (Cheffings & Farrell, 2005) prompted a revision of the Suffolk Rare Plant Register (left). All native and archaeophyte taxa have been analysed, not just those that had already been identified as rare or scarce. This analysis was been made possible by the publication of the New Atlas of the British and Irish Flora (Preston et al., 2002), which allowed comparisons to be made with the Atlas of the British Flora (Perring & Walters, 1962) for all taxa. The register follows guidelines on which species to include issued by the Botanical Society of the British Isles in June 2005. It includes all species occurring in Suffolk which are:

  • Internationally Rare - endemics and sps listed in IUCN Red Lists, EU Habitats Direstive or the Bern Convention
  • Nationally Threatened - All IUCN threat categories CR (critically endangered), EN (endangered), VU (vulnerable) and NT (near threatened) plus Nationally Rare (=RDB) - species occurring in less than 16 10-km squares in Britain
  • Nationally Scarce - species occuring in 16-100 10-km squares in Britain
  • Locally Rare - species which are present in 3 sites or fewer
  • Locally Scarce and Declining - species that are present in 10 sites or fewer, or are thought to be in serious decline

Major Publications

Book cover

A Flora of Suffolk. Sanford & Fisk (2010 Out of print)
Flora of Suffolk. Henslow & Skepper 1860 Read online
The Flora of Suffolk. Hind, W. M. 1889, London. Read online
An Ecological Flora of Breckland. Trist 1979
Simpson's Flora of Suffolk. Simpson 1982 SNS
The Orchids of Suffolk - An Atlas and History. Sanford 1991 SNS

Other papers from Suffolk Natural History

Elm in a Bury St Edmunds housing estate. N. Sibbett (2020) Open
Name changes in Stace’s New Flora of the British Isles. M. Sanford (2020) Open
A Lizard Orchid in Ipswich. M. Sanford (2020) Open
A new native plant found in Suffolk. (2020) Open
Updating the Suffolk database for native Black Poplars (Populus nigra var. betulifolia). S. Hooton (2018) Open
Flowering patterns and synchronicity of Green-winged Orchid (Anacamptis morio) at Martins’ Meadows. P. Chapman (2016) Open
Corky-fruited Water-dropwort Oenanthe pimpinelloides in Suffolk: an update. T. Gardiner & C. Strachan (2016) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. M.N. Sanford (2016) Open
Investigating the distribution of flowering spikes of Violet Helleborine Epipactis purpurata in deciduous Suffolk woodland in relation to adjacent ditches and differences in height above the base of the ditch, soil moisture and pH. D. & A. Kell (2014) Open
Some interesting plant records from herbaria. M.N. Sanford (2012) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. M.N. Sanford (2011) Open
Name changes in Stace’s New Flora of the British Isles. M.N. Sanford (2010) Open
Plant recording in 2005. M.N. Sanford (2006) Open
Plant recording in 2004. M.N. Sanford (2005) Open
Suffolk Rare Plant Register. M.N. Sanford (2005) Open
A wild giant horsetail hybrid hunt. M.N. Sanford (2005) Open
Plant recording in 2003. M.N. Sanford (2004) Open
Plant recording in 2002. M.N. Sanford (2003) Open
Plant recording in 2001. M.N. Sanford (2002) Open
Plant recording in 2000. M.N. Sanford (2001) Open
Plant recording in 1999. M.N. Sanford (2000) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde (1999) Open
(Not so) Western Gorse, Ulex gallii in Suffolk. M.N. Sanford & P.G. Lawson, (1999) Open
Game cover as a source of unusual alien plants. T.R. Abrehart (1999) p.121 Open
Unusual colour form of Green-winged Orchid. A. Cordon (1999) p.135 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1998) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1997) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1996) Open
A preliminary survey of the flora of Bamhamcross Common. M.D. Crewe (1996) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1995) Open
New East Suffolk records of wild roses. E.M. Hyde (1995) Open
A selection of Mrs Irene Vaughan's records of the wild roses of Suffolk. E.M. Hyde (1995) Open
Cochlearia danica L on Suffolk roadsides, up-dated to 1994. E.M. Hyde (1995) Open
Sea Hog's Fennel (Peucedanum officinale L.) in Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1995) Open
Unspotted Lungwort, Pulmonaria obscura Dumortier - a native species in Suffolk. Birkinshaw, C.R. & M.N. Sanford (1995) Open
Elytrigia repens (L) Desv. ex Nevski subsp. arenosa (Spenner) A. Love. P.J.O. Trist (1995) Open
Transfer of the 'Landguard Herbarium'. E.M. Hyde (1995) Open
More orchids from seed. M.N. Sanford (1995) p.38 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1994) Open
Rubus species. A.L. Bull (1994) p.51 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1993) Open
The Scarce Plants Project, 1991-2. E.M. Hyde (1993) p.45 Open
The status of Spartina maritima in Suffolk. M.A. Cooper (1993) Open
Green Nightshades. M.N. Sanford (1993) Open
Fingered Speedwell. P.J.O. Trist (1993) p.61 Open
Festuca ovina at Landguard. A. Copping (1993) p.61 Open
Amaranthus spp. M.D. Crewe (1993) p.70 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1992) Open
Updating the Suffolk Flora. F.W. Simpson (1992) Open
The genus Orobanche in Suffolk, a review of past records and taxonomy. M.N. Sanford (1992) Open
Early Spider Orchid, Ophrys sphegodes Miller reappears in Suffolk. M.N. Sanford (1992) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E. M. Hyde & F. W. Simpson (1991) Open
Stinking Goosefoot at Landguard Point. M.D. Crewe (1991) Open
Further notes on the Brambles of Suffolk. A.L. Bull (1991) Open
Cock's-eggs – a correction. M.N. Sanford (1990) p.86 Open
Molinia caerulea var. viridiflora Lajeune - a variety of Purple Moor-grass in Suffolk. P.J.O. Trist (1990) Open
Molinia caerulea subsp. altissima (Link) Domin – a Purple Moor-grass. P.J.O. Trist (1990) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1990) Open
Plant records from Landguard Common, 1985-1988. A. Copping (1990) Open
Past distribution of the Burnt Orchid, Orchis ustulata L. in Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1990) Open
More aliens. M.N. Sanford (1990) Open
Birdseed aliens. E.M. Hyde (1989) p.94 Open
Ferns on Coralline Crag. F.W. Simpson (1989) p.95 Open
Hybrid oak. F.W. Simpson (1989) p.95 Open
Old Ivy. F.W. Simpson (1989) p.95 Open
A new Bramble. A.L. Bull (1989) p.96 Open
Abnormal Round-leaved Fluellen. A.L. Bull (1989) p.96 Open
Garden aliens. M.N. Sanford (1989) p.97 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. (with drawings of Purple Viper"s Bugloss, Wallflower and Verbena rigida) E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1989) Open
The Botanical Society of the British Isles monitoring scheme in Suffolk, 1987-8. E.M. Hyde (1989) Open
The influence of farming practice on the survival and final extinction of Fingered Speedwell, Veronica triphyllos L., at Lakenheath. P.J.O. Trist (1989) Open
Bird-seed aliens. E.M. Hyde (1988) p.101 Open
An Arum Lily introduction. F.W. Simpson (1988) p.97 Open
A Suffolk Bedstraw. F.W. Simpson (1988) p.98 Open
'Hen & chickens' daisy. F.W. Simpson (1988) p.98 Open
Garden plants on Wortham Common. E.M. Hyde (1988) p.97 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1988) Open
Additions and corrections made by Rev W. M. Hind to his Flora of Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1988) Open
A new Bramble for Suffolk. A.L. Bull (1988) Open
The Leopard Marsh Orchid. M.N. Sanford (1988) Open
An uncommon hybrid orchid, Dactylorhiza × transiens. E. Milne-Redhead (1988) Open
Bird seed aliens. E.M. Hyde (1987) p.67 Open
Arum introduction. F.W. Simpson (1987) p.68 Open
Hybrid Symphytum. F.W. Simpson (1987) p.68 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records (with a drawing of Sulphur Cinquefoil -H. Thompson and of Fiddleneck - E. Beaumont). E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1987) Open
Changes in the Breckland. M.G. Rutterford (1987) Open
Moonwort - an unusual fern. G.D. Heathcote (1987) Open
Oxlips at Bulls Wood, Cockfield. G.D. Heathcote (1987) Open
The distribution of Common Calamint (Calamintha ascendens Jord.) and Lesser Calamint (Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi) in Suffolk. E.M. Hyde (1987) Open
Additions and corrections made by Rev. W. M. Hind to his Flora of Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1987) Open
Green-winged Orchid. M.N. Sanford (1986) p.74 Open
Unusual Plantains. R. Addington (1986) p.72 Open
The Lizard Orchid. G.D. Heathcote (1986) p.71 Open
Cherry Plum. F.W. Simpson (1986) p.69 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records with additions and emendations to Simpson’s Flora and a drawing of Crimson Clover (H. Thompson). E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1986) Open
The flora of Rosehill. F.W. Simpson (1986) Open
Maritime plants on Suffolk’s roadsides. E.M. Hyde (1986) Open
Survival of Sea Beet and Sugar Beet inland in Suffolk. G.D. Heathcote (1986) Open
Molinia caerulea (L.) Moench subsp. arundinacea (Schrank) H. Paul, a subspecies of Purple Moor-grass. P.J.O. Trist (1986) Open
Festuca trachyphylla (Hackel) Krajina, a grass introduced into the Suffolk Breckland. P.J.O. Trist (1986) Open
Plants growing on old walls. F.W. Simpson (1985) p.12 Open
Rare Breckland plants. E.M. Hyde (1985) p.17 Open
A Speedwell at Barton and the Roman Tulip. F.W. Simpson (1985) p.22 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1985) Open
Further plant records from Landguard Common, 1984. A. Copping (1985) Open
The Lizard Orchid (Himantoglossum hircinum) at Lakenheath-a history of happenings since 1974. M.G. Rutterford (1985) Open
The Black Poplars of Exning. G.M.S. Easy (1985) Open
Rocky Mountain Sage. F.W. Simpson (1984) p.69 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1984) Open
Additional plant records from Landguard Common, 1983. A. Copping (1984) Open
Chickweed, Stellaria media – a source of viruses affecting crop plants G.D. Heathcote (1984) Open
Calamints in Suffolk - a request. E.M. Hyde (1984) Open
More white-berried spindle. E.M. Hyde (1983) p.336 Open
Forked chickweed. F.W. Simpson (1983) p.395 Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde, M.A. Hyde, P.G. Lawson, & F.W. Simpson (1983) Open
Doubtful records of Orobanche purpurea Jacq. F.W. Simpson (1983) Open
Is Dotted Sedge, Carex punctate Gaud., a Suffolk species? C.A. Green (1983) Open
Plant records from Landguard Common (1979-82). A. Copping (1983) Open
Some Suffolk plant records 1980-81. E.M. Hyde, M.A. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1982) Open
An introductory note on the native Roses of Suffolk. I.M. Vaughan (1982) Open
The Huntingfield oak. F.W. Simpson (1982) Open
Old Ipswich gardens. F.W. Simpson (1982) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde, M.A. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1981) Open
Nineteenth century Rubus specimens from Suffolk C.A. Green (1981) Open
The brambles of Suffolk: further notes. A.L. Bull (1981) Open
A brief review of the botany of Shingle Street, Suffolk. S.E. Heath (1981) Open
Some recent Suffolk plant records. E.M. Hyde, M.A. Hyde & F.W. Simpson (1980) Open
Oenanthe pimpinelloides L. in Suffolk. E.M. Hyde (1980) Open
Notes on Oenanthe pimpinelloides L. and O. lachenalii C.C. Gmel. F.W. Simpson (1980) Open
Suffolk botany, 1929-1979. F.W. Simpson (1979) Open
Some Suffolk plant records 1977-1978. E.M. Hyde & M.A. Hyde (1979) Open
Tulipa sylvestris L. in Suffolk v.c.25. P.J.O. Trist (1979) Open
Some former sites of Tulipa sylvestris L in Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1979) Open
Fritillaria meleagris at Micklefield, Suffolk. P.J.O. Trist (1978) Open
Water Germander, Teucrium scordium (L). M.G. Rutterford (1977) Open
A century of change. A.L. Bull (1977) Open
Observations on the flora and origin of Redgrave and Lopham Fens, summer 1973. S.A. Heathcote (1975) Open
The Brambles of Suffolk. E.S. Edees (1974) Open
Narcissus "Van Sion" at Monewden. P.J.O. Trist (1974) Open
The Campions. N.R. Kerr (1974) Open
The Silvery Crocus Crocus biflorus Miller in Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1974) Open
The Silvery Crocus Crocus biflorus Miller in Britain. D. McClintock (1974) Open
Some Observations on the Flora of the Margins of the A12. W.J. Plumb (1973) Open
Suffolk County Flora. F.W. Simpson (1972) Open
A Monoecious Salix babylonensis at East Bergholt. A. Girling & A. Wilkinson (1971) Open
Festuca glauca Lam. and the var. caesia (Sm.) K. Richt Blue or Grey Fescue. P.J.O. Trist (1971) Open
Suffolk County Flora. (1971) Open
The Conservation of Roadside Verges in Suffolk. C.W. Pierce & C.E. Ranson (1971) Open
Suffolk County Flora - Suffolk Flora Committee. (1970) Open
Suffolk County Flora. F.W. Simpson (1970) Open
Hedgerow Survey. E.C. Green (1970) Open
Records of some Grasses in Suffolk 1968. P.J.O. Trist (1969) Open
Beer and Botany. M. Allan (1969) Open
The Flora of Suffolk. P.J.O. Trist (1968) Open
The Common Star of Bethlehem. J.C.N. Willis (1967) Open
The Flora of a Manorial Pasture. P.J.O. Trist (1967) Open
Fritillaria meleagris. J.C.N. Willis (1966) Open
Beccabunga. J.C.N. Willis & M.M. Whiting (1965) Open
The Coming of the Lizard Orchid to the Breck. M.G. Rutterford (1965) Open
Flora of the Coralline and Red Crags of East Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1965) Open
Breckland Flora. D.J. Martin (1964) Open
Our Flora and the Weather, 1962-63. F.W. Simpson (1963) Open
Some Botanical Notes, 1963. J.C.N. Willis (1963) Open
Avenua fatua, L. and other Graminae records for Suffolk. P.J.O. Trist (1963) Open
The Pouch Meadow, Trimley. F.W. Simpson (1963) Open
Great Oak Trees and Others. J.O. Wright (1963) Open
The Fibrous-Rooted Oxalis-Corniculatae. J.C.N. Willis (1963) Open
Dactylorchis ericetorum, Linton, and Other Orchids. J.C.N. Willis (1963) Open
Some Plants-Rare and Otherwise. J.C.N. Willis (1962) Open
Icklingham Plains: Habitat Study. P.J.O. Trist (1962) Open
The Flora of an Old Pasture. P.J.O. Trist (1962) Open
Notes on some Suffolk Grasses. F.W. Simpson (1961) Open
Records of Interesting Grasses in Suffolk, 1960-61. P.J.O. Trist (1961) Open
Some Flora Records of 1960. J.C.N. Willis (1960) Open
Ecological Study of Fritillaria meleagris. P.J.O. Trist (1960) Open
The Waveney-Ouse Valley Fens of the Suffolk-Norfolk Border. D.J. Bellamy & F. Rose (1960) Open
Botanical Excursions in East Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1960) Open
Vegetative Proliferation of Grasses and Phyllody of Clovers. P.J.O. Trist (1960) Open
County Flora Recordings. J.C.N. Willis (1959) Open
Some Plant Records of 1959. J.C.N. Willis (1959) Open
Suffolk Willows. F.W. Simpson (1959) Open
Sandpit Covert Marshes, Blythburgh, iii P.J.O. Trist (1958) Open
Flora of 3 ½ Miles of A45. N.S.P. Mitchell (1958) Open
Suffolk Grasses. F.W. Simpson (1958) Open
Notes on the Suffolk Flora. F.W. Simpson (1957) Open
Changing Flora of Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1957) Open
Changing Flora of Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1956) Open
Flora of roadside of A45. N.S.P. Mitchell (1956) Open
Plant Damage by Summer Storms. P.J.O. Trist (1956) Open
Alien and Rare Plants at Lakenheath. M.G. Rutterford (1956) Open
The Suffolk County Flora. J.C.N. Willis (1956) Open
Some Interesting Suffolk Wildflowers. E.S. Rowling (1956) Open
A Frequent Alien. P.J.O. Trist (1956) Open
Botanical Section. P.J.O. Trist (1956) Open
Uncommon Flora of Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1955) Open
Lower Abbey Farm Marsh. N.S.P. Mitchell (1955) Open
Ferns in Suffolk. A. Beaufoy (1955) Open
Sand Covert Marshes. Blythburgh P.J.O. Trist (1955) Open
Blythburgh Marshes. P.J.O. Trist (1954) Open
Sea Club Rush. T.B. Ward & P.J.O. Trist (1954) Open
Doubtful, Extinct and Uncommon Flora in Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1954) Open
Gorse and Broom on Foxhall Heath. A.E.M. Quantrill (1953) Open
Notes and Additions to Flora of Suffolk. F.W. Simpson (1953) Open
New plants in Suffolk recorded by W. A. Dutt (1870-1939). F.W. Simpson (1953) Open
Salt-tolerant Flora. P.J.O. Trist (1953) Open
Observations on twenty plants. F.W. Simpson (1952) Open
Ecology at Minsmere. P.J.O. Trist (1952) Open
Plant Records. F.W. Simpson (1952) Open
Botanical Section. F.W. Simpson (1951) Open
Changing Countryside and its Endemic Flora. F.W. Simpson (1950) Open
Wild Plants Growing on Waste Ground in Ipswich. S.J. Batchelder (1949) Open
On the Acquisition of Fritillary Field. C. Morley (1938) Open
Suffolk Five-fingers and Associate Plants. F.W. Simpson (1937) Open
The Plants of a Silted Pond. Lord Cranbrook (1936) Open
Gleanings from a Botanist"s Diary. F.W. Simpson (1936) Open
Missing, Doubtful, New or Otherwise Interesting Flora of the County. F.W. Simpson (1935) Open
A New British Plant and a New Vice-county Record. H.K. Airy-Shaw (1934) Open
Species of Plants New to Hind's Flora. R. Burn (1931) Open


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